Quantcast

United States versus Japan : A Look at the Differences in Social Media Uptake

November 18, 2010 | United States – Japan Social Media Debate, Tokyo – I am honored to be the American representative on a panel, together with 2 Japanese thought leaders in social media, to discuss the differences in how social business has accelerated in uptake in the United States versus Nippon.  Since I speak fluent Japanese, this panel will be presented in Japanese and limited to 40 participants.

This panel is being hosted by Tribal Media House and will be moderated by Takeshi Kato, who works for the famous Japanese social consultancy Looops Communications which was founded by 1 of the top 10 social media thought leaders in Japan, Toru Saito.

Joining me on the panel will be Hayato Ikeda, also known as the “Japanese Prince of Social Media” and Umeken, who at 17 years old is already a national celebrity as the representative of the “Digital Native” generation as well as leader for the Japan Twitter Society.

If you’ve been an avid reader of my blog, you already know how I’ve written a few blog posts about my perspectives on social business in the Land of the Rising Sun:

I am looking forward to taking my understanding of how social business is making inroads overseas in a very different way than here in the United States and what we can learn from that.  At the same time, I am looking forward to sharing my knowledge and experience as both a social media keynote speaker as well as social media strategy consultant here in the United States.

To register for the event, please visit the tweetvite website and be on the lookout for a potential Ustream of the event!

Enhanced by Zemanta

If you enjoyed this article, sign up for my newsletter and get FREE chapters from Neal's Books!

7 responses to “United States versus Japan : A Look at the Differences in Social Media Uptake”

  • You may find this link interesting. Having been a manager myself and dealing with the various generations at work, it was difficult to get everyone on the same page, but I did. However there are always one or two odd balls in the group that will resist. It took numerous hours/months/years even to get those folks previous to GenX to be comfortable using the modern workplace technologies. I was also glad to see that other fellow associates (GenX,Y,Z) were able to jump right in and help out with the teaching of technology to the older folks. Then on the other hand, the older folks were able to help assist the new generations with problem solving skills as well as a slew of other traits. From my experience the GENx folks have been key players to melding everyone together. GenX people were taught and understand the old school (Traditionalist ways) we did not push it to the way side. At the same time, we also have our own “spice” on matters & continue to evolve. Thus far the generations that follow the X’ers need to be aware that some things are better left as is and not to be brushed aside. Well I hope you find this interesting, it is not by any means to be swallowed as the way it should be, but merely a taste of how things have changed in the workplace. Have a Great Day Neil! Good Luck in Japan! http://www.fdu.edu/newspubs/magazine/05ws/generations.htm

    1. As a fellow GenXer, I appreciate the perspective. It’s funny because with the rise of Gen Y, Gen X has sort of become the “lost” generation. We are stuck in-between two generations with bigger voices. But we are good networkers, facilitators, and know how to live with Baby Boomers and accept Gen Y. I do believe that every generation, every person, has something to add to the conversation. That’s why I’m really exited to learn about the perspective of the “Digital Native” generation in Japan that seems even younger than our Gen Y! Look forward to my updates from Japan next week ;-)

      1. Hi David! Great article! As a speaker at universities, this issue has been raised consistently as their number one pain point: Gen Y’s sense of entitlement. Having worked with Toyota the past three years in Singapore, I was fortunate to have been instilled with aspects of their way of thinking. It’s best when both groups work together and are open to each other..worse when they aren’t. Thanks for sharing the article!

  • [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Neal Schaffer, David Kearns. David Kearns said: United States – Japan Differences in Social Media Uptake: http://disq.us/rhjtc (@nealschaffer) [...]

  • This is the things we people of the both countries are getting the updates as per their issues.So here their is the discussion board for the people.The both Japan and the United states are been making teh reviews and many things get going.

    bittorrent movies

  • This is the things we people of the both countries are getting the updates as per their issues.So here their is the discussion board for the people.The both Japan and the United states are been making teh reviews and many things get going.

    bittorrent movies

  • Thanks Hilary…and my name is Neal, not David ;-)

Leave a comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Windmills Marketing, 14271 Jeffrey Rd., Suite 177, Irvine, CA 92620 | (888) 541-3429 | info@windmillnetworking.com